Theme by Themes that you like

Isn't she loooovveeellyyyyy


The semi-art blog of a semi-person who needs to make more art. Welcome to my cozy corner of the internet.

"I fall in love with people’s passion. The way their eyes light up when they talk about the thing they love and the way they fill with light."
- Melissa Cox

heffydoodle:

mbt1991:

mrcontro:

qinni:

The whole film took me altogether about 5 grueling months (usually 10-12hours a day) to do. I often felt my butt was going to grow into the chair I usually sat at. 

Please note that this was simply my way of doing my film to achieve the soft-shaded style I wanted; there are many other ways of doing this and some are a lot faster with different results~! :)

This tut differs a bit from my dA version, because tumblr lets me put the combination of gifs and jpegs :D. 

Here’s a book that will really help you start animating:


here’s some books that are good for composition, storytelling and colours:


I hope these helped

I ask that no one removes the credit or source for this tutorial/guide please. thanks :)

And this is a keeper!  No doubt about that!  :)

I’m just gonna put this one on standby

for when I start my senior film!

sinisteray:

Can’t remember where I found this, but from the watermark I can only assume the source is ImagineFX magazine, the September 2008 issue.
 
If this gets enough notes I’ll caption each photo with the text displayed in each page! (‘Tis a bit small. Curse you, tumblr, get some better zoom! <shakes fist>)

ziggy9911 asked:
Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

jakewyattriot:

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

Layered, interior spaces:

You get the idea.

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you

hatelyn:

here’s how I do it not too good bc I drew this in like 4 minutes LOL but ya basic idea

hatelyn:

here’s how I do it not too good bc I drew this in like 4 minutes LOL but ya basic idea

bunnyshadeow:

anon asked me how do I draw different sized boobs so I whipped up a tutorial (I draw slow, sorry) I am not a good expert at boobies soo sorry x2! weh haha
basically flat = pointy-ish, as boobs size increase the lower half gets rounder, then the top half. boobies are floppy towards the sides due to gravity

shape/perspective of boobs

all the oppais!
even though I am still not really good at drawing boobs at all sigh… i hope you find this useful even for a bit hahaa……..;;

bunnyshadeow:

anon asked me how do I draw different sized boobs so I whipped up a tutorial (I draw slow, sorry) I am not a good expert at boobies soo sorry x2! weh haha

basically flat = pointy-ish, as boobs size increase the lower half gets rounder, then the top half. boobies are floppy towards the sides due to gravity

image

shape/perspective of boobs

image

all the oppais!

even though I am still not really good at drawing boobs at all sigh… i hope you find this useful even for a bit hahaa……..;;

sharpasakunaike:

finally got around to posting my brush settings!! sorry for the wait everyone omg but these brushes are the only ones i use mostly uvu

sharpasakunaike:

finally got around to posting my brush settings!! sorry for the wait everyone omg but these brushes are the only ones i use mostly uvu

wannabeanimator:

Tips on color & light from The Artist’s Guide to Color by Wendon Blake

sparth:

a little step by step process for my “hangar image posted today”.
sorry i know i should do videos, but i guess i’m getting old. all the tests from a few years back were slowing down my machine, transforming the experience into something really crappy. must try again.

a small explanation for all steps:
01 - basic block in of the hangar
02 - further refining, mostly blocking a good compo
03 - adding the vehicle
04 - a small overlay in the greens to emphasize shadows
05 - auto color (or auto tone?) to obtain richer tones
06 - describing the loco
07 - 2 overlays and one darken layer to take care of slightly limiting the bright white areas, as well as obtaining better shadows and dark areas. also putting a touch of bright light in the upper left.
08 - another describing phase. lights done simply with a color dodge.
09 - smoke and flags. self explanatory
10 - final pass using once again the “auto color” mode. erasing afterwards to leave the background with the original yellow. this step is reintroducing colder tones where needed.

Anonymous asked:
kel i know you probably hadn't posted any art with gas mask on it, but i wonder if you have some tips for me to draw the gas mask u_u

kelpls:

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

YEAH JUST REMEBER NOT TO DRAW IT TOO CLOSE TO THE FACE bc there’s actually a space between the mask and face IT’s not tightly fitted HOPE THAT HLEPS SORRY IT”S A SO SCRIBBLY I need to sleep 

steampoweredrocket:

Hey ya’ll, if you’re struggling with towns or scenes, this is great

Drawing Tutorial: Hair

pencilpushingenthusiast:

image

For the sweet Anon who requested tips for curly hair :)

Row 1: A logical starting point = The head! Basically, by first putting down a nicely shaped skull (think tilted “egg” here), you provide yourself the necessary framework upon which you can then build hair “movement.”

Read More

helpyoudraw:

Clothing Folds (Part 1) by DarlingMionette on DeviantArt 

Adding the bigger version of the previously posted tutorial for the anons who couldn’t read it, also added the source. The second part will be added very soon. -ivona