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The semi-art blog of a semi-person who needs to make more art. Welcome to my cozy corner of the internet.

"I fall in love with people’s passion. The way their eyes light up when they talk about the thing they love and the way they fill with light."
- Melissa Cox

actegratuit:

Art is a personal composition of the reality that surrounds us and artist/scientist Casey Cripe’s work takes that concept to a crazy intricate level. Each piece is a map of the exploration of life, self and the universe. His ability to capture the beauty of anatomical figures and scientific complexities result in an imaginative juxtaposition of the surreal and hyper-real.

kisu-no-hi:

The palette challenge is surprisingly very fun to do

jakewyattriot:

I apologize as this comes off as disrespectful to Michael Brown or Trayvon Martin. Or their families. Or YOU, the reader. I’m not about that. That’s not why I drew this.

I am just really freaked out that 40% of Americans (and 47% of White Americans) do not think that the killings and violence in Ferguson ‘raise any racial issues.’ Fellow White Persons, this is our chance to learn. This is our chance to change.

When Trayvon Martin was murdered because Full Grown Men in America are frightened to violence by the presence black children, the dialogue turned very quickly into a conversation about gun control.

And gun control is an issue that deserves our attention.

But it won’t change the massive poverty in Black America. The arrest rate. The education statistics. The institutional, systemic, casual, or passive racism that plagues our country.

And it wouldn’t have saved Michael Brown.

Anyway. I’m sorry if this comes off as disrespectful or insincere or preachy. I’m sorry if my execution (or personality) gets in the way of what I’m trying to say. I am an imperfect artist, an imperfect person, and I am, undoubtedly, blinded to a million things by my own glaring whiteness. So this might be… Lord, this might be awful. I’m so sorry if it’s awful. Really.

But. I just keep thinking… Look, my wife is pregnant with our first child. A boy. We’re nervous, we’re excited, we’re SO ANXIOUS because what the hell do you do with babies? WE don’t know. But if we were a black family… in this country… we would be so terrified. Because we live in a nation that murders the children of black parents, puts it on the news WITH RIOTS AND TEAR GAS as decoration, and still half of us don’t even see it as a problem. Can you imagine that? Can you imagine bringing a child into that reality, to face the odds we lay out for black kids?

That would break me. I’ve never known anything like that. No one should ever know anything like that.

So let’s talk to our friends about race. Lets talk to our families. And when actual victims of racism try to tell us what’s going on in, say, a peaceful community protest as they are being gassed and shot at by cops WE SHOULD LISTEN TO AND BELIVE THEM. Let’s talk to each other about this until we are all on the same page.

And then let’s turn the damn page.

mermaidskey:


hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

nekoama:

I was going to make an informative comic but instead I made it silly.

nekoama:

I was going to make an informative comic but instead I made it silly.

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.
First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.
A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.
Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?
Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.
Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).
Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.
Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?
The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.
It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.
It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.

First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.

A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.

Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?

Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.

Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).

Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.

Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?

The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.

It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.

It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

pagalini:

pagalini:

preach it, my feminist dragon princesses

now complete! this set will be going up on my redbubble shop as tshirts and stickers c:


Polly Barnard or The Study for Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (ca. 1885) by John Singer Sargent 

Polly Barnard or The Study for Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (ca. 1885) by John Singer Sargent