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The semi-art blog of a semi-person who needs to make more art. Welcome to my cozy corner of the internet.

"I fall in love with people’s passion. The way their eyes light up when they talk about the thing they love and the way they fill with light."
- Melissa Cox

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.

Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

(Article)

nitratediva:

Jean Harlow preens in Dinner at Eight (1933).

nitratediva:

Jean Harlow preens in Dinner at Eight (1933).

nubbsgalore:

photos by gerry ellis from the david sheldrick wildlife trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in kenya’s tsavo east national park. here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. the elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.

when elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. but as dame daphne sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”

approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. with an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years.

cbc’s the nature of things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. you can foster an elephant with the david sheldrick wildlife trust online here. for more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the david sheldrick wildlife trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts

  • Riza Hawkeye: How long have you been in love with Winry?
  • Edward Elric: That’s disgusting. And wrong. I don’t even get... why would... I’ve never been in love with anyone, anywhere. It’s none of your... you have... the nerve, the audacity! Winry is my mechanic, technically. And she is terrible, face-wise. And how... how do I know, frankly, that you’re not in love with her? Maybe you are. Maybe you’re trying to throw me off? Hmm! Check and mate. This is an outrage! Who do I call?
  • Beyoncé ***Flawless (Remix) featuring Nicki Minaj
    Beyoncé
    ***Flawless (Remix) featuring Nicki Minaj

    justinharenchar:

    ***Flawless (Remix) | Beyoncé featuring Nicki Minaj

    We escalate up in this bitch like elevators.
    Of course, sometimes shit go down
    when it’s a billion dollars on an elevator.

    automatically:

    if you want a nice body, go get it. if you want to become a lawyer, study your ass off. if you want nice hair, pick a style and get it done. stop being afraid and motivate yourself. find yourself. find your happiness, because it’s out there waiting for you.

    "

    Remember that intimate conversation you had with your son? The one where you said, “I love you and I need you to know that no matter how a woman dresses or acts, it is not an invitation to cat call, taunt, harass or assault her”?

    Or when you told your son, “A woman’s virginity isn’t a prize and sleeping with a woman doesn’t earn you a point”?

    How about the heart-to-heart where you lovingly conferred the legal knowledge that “a woman doesn’t have to be fighting you and you don’t have to be pinning her down for it to be RAPE. Intoxication means she can’t legally consent, NOT that she’s an easy score.”

    Or maybe you recall sharing my personal favorite, “Your sexual experiences don’t dictate your worth just like a woman’s sexual experiences don’t dictate hers.”

    Last but not least, do you remember calling your son out when you discovered he was using the word “slut” liberally? Or when you overheard him talking about some girl from school as if she were more of a conquest than a person?

    I want you to consider these conversations and then ask yourself why you don’t remember them. The likely reason is because you didn’t have them. In fact, most parents haven’t had them.

    "
    "

    When her kiss transforms the Beast, she is furious.

    "You should have warned me! Here I was smitten by an exceptional being, and all of a sudden, my fiance becomes an ordinary distinguished young man!"

    "
    the 1909 play Beauty and the Beast:  Fantasy in Two Acts by Fernand Noziere, the very first published version of the story where the Beauty is disappointed when the Beast transforms into a human at the end. (via corseque)